Sinners Prayer, Is Ask Jesus into your Heart Enough?

“Do you want to be saved? Then just ask Jesus to come into your heart.” While this statement is not anti-biblical, neither is it expressly biblical. The wording generates a mental image that can easily lead to wrong impressions, especially among children, who tend to take things literally. Plus, the exhortation to “ask Jesus into your heart” if that’s the whole message leaves out some important things such as repentance and faith. The Bible does mention the fact that, in some sense, Jesus resides in our hearts: Paul prayed “that Christ may dwell in your hearts through faith” (Ephesians 3:17). But Paul is writing to believers who had already received Christ. The parallel prayer in verse 16 is that God “may strengthen you with power through his Spirit in your inner being.” There is no evangelistic appeal in the context of Ephesians 3. Paul is not telling the Ephesians to “ask Jesus into their hearts”; he is simply elevating their awareness that Jesus is present within them through the Holy Spirit.

The verse from which the “ask Jesus into your heart” concept is usually taken is Revelation 3:20, “Here I am! I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in and eat with that person, and they with me.” Notice, however, that the verse does not mention the heart at all. Neither does the individual ask Jesus to do anything; rather, Jesus asks us to do something. In context, Jesus is speaking to the church of Laodicea, who was in desperate need of repentance (verse 19). The Laodiceans had effectively excluded Jesus from their fellowship, and the Lord was seeking to restore that fellowship. The passage does not deal with a person calling on the Lord for salvation.

The idea of Jesus “coming into your heart” is nowhere used in any preaching in the Bible. The gospel is the good news of Jesus’ death and resurrection for the forgiveness of our sin (1 Corinthians 15:3-4). Gospel presentations in the Bible exhort a proper response to that message: believe (John 3:16; Acts 16:31), receive (John 1:12), or repent (Acts 3:19). We are to change our minds about our sin and about who Christ is, believe Jesus died and rose again, and receive the gift of eternal life by faith. None of the apostles ever told someone to “ask Jesus into your heart.”

HeartOften, the exhortation to “ask Jesus to come into your heart” is used as a simple way to say, “Ask Jesus to enter your life” or “Allow the Lord to take control.” If this is done in the context of presenting the whole gospel, then there’s no harm done. But before a person is invited to “ask Jesus into your heart,” he or she should understand sin and its penalty, the payment Christ made on the cross, and the reality of Christ’s resurrection. In fact, referring to salvation as Jesus’ “coming into your heart” might even help a person understand that the Spirit of Christ comes to indwell the soul (see John 14:17). Still, it is always best to use the terminology the Bible uses. “Ask Jesus into your heart” does not fully communicate what is actually occurring at salvation.

When sharing the gospel, we should be careful what we say and how we say it. Even the word believe can be misleading if it is presented as mere intellectual assent (agreeing that certain facts are true) instead of as trust (relying on those true facts). Judas Iscariot believed certain facts about Jesus, but he never trusted Jesus for salvation. Salvation is not about believing a list of facts. Salvation is not about asking Jesus to come into your heart. Salvation is not even about asking God to forgive you. Salvation is about trusting in Jesus as your Savior, receiving the forgiveness He offers by grace through faith. Salvation is about being made new through the sacrifice of Jesus Christ and the power of the Holy Spirit (Titus 3:5).

Faith and salvation is given freely and the Holy Ghost, “Christ within” us is not something we can earn. IT DOES HAPPEN, and should happen, according to scripture.

Another way to present this opportunity for JESUS to come inside and abide would be to follow the example of the ORIGINAL 11 disciples of Christ, Paul/Saul the “one born out of due time”, and the early church as recorded in the book of Acts (Acts, Is the only place in scripture will you will find the verbatim preaching of an anointed man of God, preaching to a “lost soul”/sinner/unregenerate human, and telling them how they should respond to (obey) the gospel AFTER THE RESURRECTION of Jesus.) Acts 2/Acts 8/ Acts 10/ Acts 19; etc)

James said, “As the body without the spirit is DEAD, so is FAITH WITHOUT WORKS”, action. (Faith, which can only be given by God, is the conduit through which the saving “grace” of God MUST flow.) WORKS/ACTION IS WHAT GIVES FAITH LIFE, else it is dead. Faith must be defined by scripture, and CAN NOT BE EARNED.

THERE IS NOT ONE ACTION OF SALVATION which is contrived or earned by MAN, it is all freely given by God through Jesus Christ, AND IT MUST BE RECEIVED AND OBEYED by Jesus, THE WORD, AND THE HOLY GHOST WORKING IN US.

I personally believe it’s much better to just preach the same “Gospel” the apostles preached which is;

THE BIRTH of JESUS
THE LIFE of JESUS
THE DEATH of JESUS
THE BURIAL of JESUS
THE RESURRECTION of JESUS
(an example of the “faith of Jesus Christ, “thy will be done” and it was “DONE”/ACTIVATED/”WORK”ED OUT through the actions of JESUS CHRIST)

THE RESPONSE of the faith of JESUS Christ moving the heart/mind/spirit of a convicted “sinner” which brings about confession of sin and repentance. (Death)
Acts 2:37 “Men & brethren, what shall we do?”

The work of JESUS CHRIST moving in the heart on that human to follow Him in burial through water baptism in “the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins” Act 2:38

The continuing WORK OF JESUS CHRIST to fill that human soul with His Spirit/Holy Ghost/Holy Spirit (Resurrection Spirit the “1st fruits” of the coming resurrection) For the promise is to “ALL that are afar off, even as many as THE LORD our GOD shall call.” Acts 2:39

ALL OF THIS IS THE WORK OF CHRIST AND MUST BE FULFILLED IN FAITH, else it would ALL be in vain.

This is the scriptural was the “ask JESUS into your HEART.”

It’s AWESOME AND REAL!! “Taste and see.”

So now that I have covered this completely, Yes, asking Christ to come into your heart is definitely Biblical. Heart and soul are synonymous in Scripture, and they refer to a person’s mind, will and feelings, meaning their intellect, volition, and emotion.

Having Christ established firmly in those three areas is probably the most accurate and Biblical way of describing the process of Salvation from the penalty of sin. It is also important to see the other two aspects of salvation: from sin’s power (which we work out daily with fear and trembling) and its presence which we will experience when Christ comes to take us home.

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