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God Mandate Capital Punishment for Murder

After Noah, his family, and the animals exited the ark, God gave a new command: put to death anyone who murders another person. Genesis 9:6 says, “Whoever sheds the blood of man, by man shall his blood be shed, for God made man in his own image.” The severest of penalties is to follow murder, and God Himself gives the reason for it.

God specified that murder was to be punished by death because of the nature of man. Man is created in God’s own image (Genesis 1:27). As murder destroys an image-bearer, it is a direct affront to God Himself. Humans are unique among God’s creations-none of the animals are created in God’s likeness-and murder is a unique crime.

Another, secondary reason for the mandate is quite practical. The immediate context includes another command given to Noah and his three sons: “Be fruitful and multiply and fill the earth” (Genesis 9:1). Murder, of course, would work against humanity’s being fruitful and multiplying. The death penalty for murder thus served as a deterrent to anyone who sought to thwart God’s plan to replenish the earth. This was especially important when Noah’s family first departed from the ark, at which point only eight people were alive.

Before the Flood, Cain had murdered Abel, and, although Cain was judged by God, he was not put to death (Genesis 4). Lamech, a descendant of Cain, also murdered someone (Genesis 4:23-24). By the time of God’s judgment in Genesis 6; it appears that crime was rampant, including the crime of murder. After the Flood, a new standard was raised as part of the recreated earth: God would no longer tolerate murder. Later, murder was condemned in the Ten Commandments (Exodus 20). The punishment for premeditated murder was death (Numbers 35:30-34).

God mandate capital punishment for murderIn the New Testament, Jesus provided a wider application of the Old Testament command against murder. He taught, “You have heard that it was said to those of old, ‘You shall not murder; and whoever murders will be liable to judgment.’ But I say to you that everyone who is angry with his brother will be liable to judgment; whoever insults his brother will be liable to the council; and whoever says, ‘You fool!’ will be liable to the hell of fire” (Matthew 5:21-22). Murder is wrong, and the attitude behind the action is just as wrong. God sees the heart and its intentions (1 Samuel 16:7).

Murder is consistently listed as a sin throughout the New Testament (e.g., Revelation 22:15). Man still bears the image of God, and God’s view of murder has remained the same, even abortion.

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Meaning of Pishon in the Bible

The Pishon (Hebrew: פִּישׁוֹן‎‎ Pîšōn) is one of four rivers (along with Hiddekel (Tigris), Phrath (Euphrates) and Gihon)

The only mention of the word Pishon in the Bible is found in the book of Genesis: “A river flowed out of Eden to water the garden, and there it divided and became four rivers. The name of the first is the Pishon. It is the one that flowed around the whole land of Havilah, where there is gold. And the gold of that land is good; bdellium and onyx stone are there” (Genesis 2:10-12). It’s only when we compare the richness and beauty of the river to that of the Garden of Eden itself, that we are really able to discern the meaning of Pishon.

Besides the lone biblical reference, Pishon is mentioned in Sirach 24:25 of the Apocrypha. It is probably connected with the Hebrew root puwsh, which means “scatter, press on, break loose, or spring forward.” The River Pishon most likely originated from a spring and formed a delta. Jones’ Dictionary of Old Testament Proper Names defines Pishon as “Great Diffusion.”

It is virtually impossible to determine where the Pishon River flowed during the pre-Flood era. The same is true for practically any location during that time, including Eden. Some scientists believe that the Pishon could be the Nile, the Indus, or the Ganges. There is simply no modern river that matches the description given in Genesis. Without question, the world’s topography prior to the worldwide Flood (Genesis 6:17) was totally different from what it is today.

Although Pishon’s location is obscure, its description and purpose are not. The Garden of Eden that God prepared was not only bountiful, it was lush and beautiful. It was a place rich with life-giving water, a land lavished with precious metals and jewels. The gold and onyx associated with the River Pishon are reminiscent of the tabernacle’s furnishings and priestly garments (Exodus 25:1-9; 1 Chronicles 29:2). Gold overlay finished the sacred furniture of the tabernacle (Exodus 25:11). Particularly important was the onyx stone of the priestly ephod, upon which were inscribed the names of the twelve tribes (Exodus 28:9-14), and the onyx of the high priest’s breastplate (Exodus 28:20).

The land of Havilah, ringed by the Pishon, is indicative of the presence and blessing of God. Furthermore, the Pishon and the other three rivers from Eden eventually marked the boundaries of the land pledged to Abraham (Genesis 15:18). As God had prepared and assigned Eden to Adam’s care, the “paradise” of Canaan’s land was given to Abraham and his descendants.

There is no question that the surface of the earth is grossly different today than it was prior to the flood (as mentioned here by and well-established by Whitcomb and Morris, in their 1961 book, The Genesis Flood.) However, Genesis 10:25 and first Chronicles 1:19 make no “clear” statement regarding the surface of the earth. Although many scholars have taken Peleg to mean earthquake, because the “earth was divided,” it is important to note there is another equally viable interpretation, which can be found in the ancient manuscript known as the Book of Jubilees.

Life-Giving Water

Life-Giving Water

Here, in chapters 8 and 9 (RH Charles 1917 translation), the story is told of Noah dividing the lands in the days of Peleg, by lot, amongst his three sons, Shem, Japheth, and Ham, who further divided their allotments amongst their 16 sons. Amidst these lots, islands and distant lands are described from north to south, which, if true, would probably suggest the dividing of the earth into continents as a primary result of the Genesis flood. It is notable that some historians have further claimed these allotments, as described in Jubilees, clearly fit with the general distribution of the various tribes or clans on the earth today.

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Anunnaki in the Epic of Gilgamesh the Nephilim mentioned in the Bible

Ancient Sumer-Babylon, like many cultures of antiquity, produced mythologies to explain the world around them. The Epic of Gilgamesh is one such mythology. Several versions of the epic poem exist, but the 12-tablet Akkadian version is the best known. The story centers on the friendship between the principal character, Gilgamesh, and Enkidu. Gilgamesh, the king of Uruk, is two-thirds god and one-third man. He has oppressed the people of Uruk, so the gods create Enkidu to distract Gilgamesh. Their unlikely friendship results in a journey of fantastical adventures resulting in the death of Enkidu.

An important feature of this epic is a “flood” story in which a character named Utnapishtim and his wife survive a great flood and obtain immortality. The existence of this flood story, with its many similarities to the Genesis account, indicates a common source. Rather than the Genesis flood account being copied from the Epic of Gilgamesh, both accounts are entirely separate records of something that actually occurred, namely, a global flood.

Anunnaki from GilgameshThe gods who appear in the Epic of Gilgamesh are the Anunnaki, a name that probably means “those of royal blood” or “princely offspring” in the ancient Sumerian language. In contrast to this pagan mythology is the biblical account of the Nephilim. Who were the Nephilim? Biblically speaking, the Nephilim were the descendants of the sons of God and daughters of men (Genesis 6:1-4). While there are differing interpretations of this passage, WHATSHOTN believes it involves the fallen angels (sons of God) taking on human form and mating with the daughters of men (human females), thereby producing a race of angelic-human half-breeds.

Is there a connection between the Anunnaki and the Nephilim? Perhaps. It is definitely interesting to note that both the biblical flood account and the Epic of Gilgamesh mention supernatural, god-like beings interacting with humanity in connection with a global flood. So, it is possible that the myths regarding the Anunnaki originate in the reality that was the Nephilim.

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Origin of Baptism

First, it must be understood that baptism is an outward proclamation of an inward conversion. In other words, baptism is a ceremonial act undertaken after a person accepts Jesus Christ as his or her Lord and Savior. This is usually done in the presence of the church body as a public proclamation of one’s faith.

Concerning the origin of baptism, Christian theologians suggest that although Christian baptism may have been widely used by John the Baptist, baptism itself did not originate with Christians or, for that matter, with John. Jews practiced baptism as a traditional act of purification and the initiation of converts to Judaism long before the coming of the Messiah. The origins of baptism might be found in the book of Leviticus where the Levite priests were commanded to perform a symbolic cleansing in water before and after performing their priestly duties. Leviticus 16:4 tells us, “He is to put on the sacred linen tunic, with linen undergarments next to his body; he is to tie the linen sash around him and put on the linen turban. These are sacred garments; so he must bathe himself with water before he puts them on.” Scripture also states in Leviticus 16:23-24, “Then Aaron is to go into the Tent of Meeting and take off the linen garments he put on before he entered the Most Holy Place, and he is to leave them there. He shall bathe himself with water in a holy place and put on his regular garments. Then he shall come out and sacrifice the burnt offering for himself and the burnt offering for the people, to make atonement for himself and for the people.”

Although the act described in these Old Testament passages was not specifically called “baptism,” it does highlight how important and holy ceremonial (and practical) cleansing is to God. John’s “baptism of repentance” (Luke 3:3; Acts 19:4) followed this paradigm of cleansing, although the final cleansing from sin is only available through Christ, and John’s baptism was the foreshadowing of that. The significance of baptism as a New Testament ceremony is that, as believers in Jesus Christ, we are baptized into His death (Romans 6:3) and raised to walk in newness of life (Romans 6:4 KJV). The Lord taught the significance of baptism to the extent that He Himself was baptized by John the Baptist at the start of His ministry (Mark 1:9).

Like most of the essential doctrines and rites of the Christian faith baptism has deep symbolic roots in the types and shadows of the Old Testament and profound implications for New Testament believers. Linguistically and historically, it can be linked with most of the cleansing rituals of Judaism, especially the sprinkling with water or with the blood of sacrificed animals using hyssop (Exodus 12:22, Leviticus 14; Numbers 19; Psalm 51:7, John 19:29, Hebrews 9:19). The subject of baptism is initially introduced in the New Testament through accounts of the ministry of John the Baptist. Although we encounter John in the pages of the Gospels, he was actually an Old Testament prophet. John was under the law, not grace, and his mission, to prepare the way for Christ, came prior to the inauguration of the Kingdom of God (Mt 11:7-15). His audiences and baptismal candidates were also Jewish people under the law (Mt 3:5-6). The more pious of the Jews deeply resented John’s call to repentance and cleansing. Up to that point only gentile proselytes to the Jewish faith were required to be baptized.

When John appeared, he told devout Jews that being Jewish was not enough (Mt 3:9). Like the gentiles, they needed to be cleansed and to make themselves ready (repent). The King is coming; make His paths straight (Isa 40:3, Malachi 3:1, Mt 3:3). It is significant that Jesus as well as the Jewish people recognized John the Baptist as a true prophet of God under the law (Mt 11:9-11). As such, he literally spoke for God and his words were law, just as binding as the written law. That is why Jesus insisted on being baptized by John. In order to be an acceptable sacrifice for our sins, He had to be perfectly righteous, fulfilling all of God’s law on our behalf including the latest oracles delivered by John (Mt 3:13-15). However, the baptism ordained by Jesus prior to His ascension is fundamentally different from John’s baptism in its significance, i.e., what it signifies. The baptism ordained by Jesus (Mat 28:19-20) transcends John’s baptism of repentance (Ephesians 4:4-6).

Origin-of-Baptism-whathotnWhile John’s baptism was a cleansing rite, the sacrament of baptism we practice now is a sign and seal of the new covenant in Christ Jesus in the same sense that circumcision was a sign and seal of the old covenant (1 Peter 3:21-22). Baptism in the new covenant is the counterpart of and replacement for the rite of circumcision in the old covenant. Circumcision was a physical act producing a physical mark that signified a person was a member of the Jewish nation and household of faith either by birth or through conversion. Baptism today is a physical act producing a spiritual mark that signifies a person is a member of the household of faith in Jesus Christ by new birth and conversion (Galatians 3:26-27, John 3:5). It is a better sign and seal for a better covenant (Hebrews 8:6-13). Baptism does not mutilate the body (the temple of the Holy Spirit), is available to everyone equally (not gender specific), and is wonderfully symbolic of our identification with Christ in His death, burial and resurrection (Romans 6:1-7).

Jesus needed to be baptized to fulfill high priest holy ceremonial cleansing to God, that the high priest would do once a year. The Hoy Spirit descended ON, Him like a dove because Jesus needed to fulfill God’s perfect plan of redemption BEFORE, the Holy Spirit could live inside us. For we before that time was dead inside because of sin, and the Holy Spirit could not, and will not live in a grave.

So then, the origins of baptism are seen in story of the flood (1 Peter 3:20-21), in the first Passover prior to the exodus, in the exodus itself, in the crossing of the red sea, in the cleansing rituals under the law, and in the rite of circumcision. It follows the general pattern in scripture of progressive revelation (first the physical, then the spiritual) as God demonstrates His will and His character to His people in ever increasing detail and clarity. Today, we enjoy the privilege of participating in the sacrament of baptism as a wonderful means of grace, rich in the beauty of symbolism. As we publicly identify with our Lord by physically acting out the drama of His suffering, death, burial and resurrection through the Christ ordained ritual of baptism we are spiritually marked as children of the household of faith by His grace and mercy.

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The Seventh Seal of Revelation – The Meaning of The Silence In Heaven

And when he had opened the seventh seal, there was silence in heaven about the space of half an hour. – Revlation 8:1.

Of the many hard-to-decipher passages in the Book of Revelation, verse 1 of chapter 8, is one of few attempt to interpret. The Seventh Seal is a monumental event in Heaven, but what does it mean? Why is there silence? This article will attempt to explain the meaning of the silence in Heaven and explain why it is a critical aspect not just of end times events but of the life of every person who has ever lived.

The Meaning of The Silence in Heaven

Be silent, O all flesh, before the Lord: for he is raised up out of his holy habitation.

Be silent, O all flesh, before the Lord: for he is raised up out of his holy habitation.

In our article, Who Are The Four Horsemen of The Apocalypse?, House of the Nazarene (To be Lord willing done,) detailed the meaning of the first four seals of Revelation 6. The Seven Sealed Book was given to The Lord Jesus Christ upon His triumphant ascension and return to Heaven, having defeated Satan, death and the grave in His death, burial and resurrection. Jesus Christ is the only one found worthy to open the book and it is given to Him as He took His seat of honor at the Right Hand of God the Father. From there, the first four seals were opened, unleashing a series of spirits who bring judgments and tribulation to the world throughout the entirety of the church age. The 5th seal is then opened which brings the spirit of persecution and martyrdom that Christians have experienced from the first century AD and continue to today.
The opening of the 6th Seal triggers the Rapture and the Day of The Lord, (Work in progress, Stay Tuned!) the time at which God will pour out His wrath on the unbelieving world. Revelation chapter 6 ends with the powerful people of the world fully understanding that the cataclysmic global earthquake and events of the 6th seal are of divine origin:

And I beheld when he had opened the sixth seal, and, lo, there was a great earthquake; and the sun became black as sackcloth of hair, and the moon became as blood; And the stars of heaven fell unto the earth, even as a fig tree casteth her untimely figs, when she is shaken of a mighty wind. And the heaven departed as a scroll when it is rolled together; and every mountain and island were moved out of their places. And the kings of the earth, and the great men, and the rich men, and the chief captains, and the mighty men, and every bondman, and every free man, hid themselves in the dens and in the rocks of the mountains; And said to the mountains and rocks, Fall on us, and hide us from the face of him that sitteth on the throne, and from the wrath of the Lamb: For the great day of his wrath is come; and who shall be able to stand? – Revelation 6:12-17.

 

This shaking of Heaven and Earth is the time that God rises to personally intervene and judge the centuries of sin and evil of unbelieving, unrepentant humanity. It is also a wake up call to Israel to return to the worship of the God of their fathers. Hence we see first the Rapture and then the sealing of the 144,000 Jewish witnesses (Work in progress, Stay Tuned!), who will share the Gospel of the Kingdom with Jewish people and the world in the first part of the Day of The Lord/Great Tribulation. These are the events of Revelation Chapter 7 and serves as the backdrop for Revelation Chapter 8 and the opening of the 7th seal.

A Sign of Coming Judgment

The silence in Heaven serves a very specific purpose.

The silence in Heaven serves a very specific purpose.

The silence in Heaven is a sign of God’s impending devastating judgment. When a people or nation or even the world is so far gone into rebellion against God with no repentance, The Lord removes His Holy people and allows for a period of “silence”, right before His judgements are unleashed onto the world. How can this be so? Well The Bible instructs on how to interpret and understand Scripture:

Whom shall he teach knowledge? and whom shall he make to understand doctrine? them that are weaned from the milk, and drawn from the breasts. For precept must be upon precept, precept upon precept; line upon line, line upon line; here a little, and there a little: – Isaiah 28:9-10.

 

The Bible is to be interpreted by using Scripture to interpret Scripture – that is, using parts of the Bible to understand similar parts. The Apostle Paul summed this method up stating:

Now we have received, not the spirit of the world, but the spirit which is of God; that we might know the things that are freely given to us of God. Which things also we speak, not in the words which man’s wisdom teacheth, but which the Holy Ghost teacheth; comparing spiritual things with spiritual. – 1 Corinthians 2:12-13.

So where can examples or types and shadows of this Heavenly silence be found in Scripture? The first example is in the Days of Noah.

The Silence Before The Flood

The Lord’s preacher of the Gospel went silent for seven days before the flood.

The Lord’s preacher of the Gospel went silent for seven days before the flood.

The Days of Noah were infamous for being a time of global, rampant rebellion against God. Humanity, plagued by their own sinful lust and the influx of Nephilim giant hybrids, had become so deep in sin that the Bible says, “..God saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every imagination of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually.” (Genesis 6:5). God then instructed Noah to prepare an ark because in the years to come, The Lord was going to destroy the entire world with a flood. Noah, was a “preacher of righteousness.” He was not just a believer in The Lord, he committed his life to preaching belief in God to those in his society. But once the ark was prepared, God brought the preaching of His faithful servant to a close:

the LORD said unto Noah, Come thou and all thy house into the ark; for thee have I seen righteous before me in this generation. Of every clean beast thou shalt take to thee by sevens, the male and his female: and of beasts that are not clean by two, the male and his female… For yet seven days, and I will cause it to rain upon the earth forty days and forty nights; and every living substance that I have made will I destroy from off the face of the earth. And Noah did according unto all that the LORD commanded him. And Noah was six hundred years old when the flood of waters was upon the earth. And Noah went in, and his sons, and his wife, and his sons’ wives with him, into the ark, because of the waters of the flood… There went in two and two unto Noah into the ark, the male and the female, as God had commanded Noah. And it came to pass after seven days, that the waters of the flood were upon the earth. (Genesis 7).

So once the ark was complete, God instructed Noah to take all of his family and all of the animals and enter into the ark for seven days. The passage in Genesis goes back over this detail to emphasize its significance.

In the self same day entered Noah, and Shem, and Ham, and Japheth, the sons of Noah, and Noah’s wife, and the three wives of his sons with them, into the ark; They, and every beast after his kind, and all the cattle after their kind, and every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth after his kind, and every fowl after his kind, every bird of every sort. And they went in unto Noah into the ark, two and two of all flesh, wherein is the breath of life. And they that went in, went in male and female of all flesh, as God had commanded him: and the LORD shut him in. (Genesis 7).

Not only was Noah commanded to enter the ark seven days in advance, on the same day he entered and got every person and creature on board, God shut the door Himself. The chance to hear the preaching of repentance before the worst judgment the world had seen was over. No longer would the preacher of righteousness, who knew the flood was coming, be able to warn anyone. Instead, the completed ark sat in silence for seven days, with no one going in or out.So the sinful, rebellious world were left in ignorance. The Lord Jesus Christ confirms this in Matthew 24:

But as the days of Noah were, so shall also the coming of the Son of man be. For as in the days that were before the flood they were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage, until the day that Noe entered into the ark, And knew not until the flood came, and took them all away; so shall also the coming of the Son of man be. – Matthew 24:37-39.

 

The devastating flood came which destroyed all people, nephilim and creatures from the Earth, except for those who were safely aboard the divinely-designed ship. The silence of God preceded utter judgment and destruction. This pattern is seen again in an even more powerful way in the book of Joshua.

The Battle of Jericho

Jericho seemed to be invincible until it experienced God’s wrath.

Jericho seemed to be invincible until it experienced God’s wrath.

The Book of Joshua is an amazing book for the student of the Bible. It is full of types and shadows of the end times. In many ways, the book runs parallel to the book of Revelation (for more information on this please our article: Joshua’s Great Battle: A Preview of War With The Antichrist). (Work in progress, Stay Tuned!) After being freed from the Egyptians by God in the Exodus, the Battle of Jericho was the first battle the ancient Israelites waged to actually enter the Promised Land. It is a type and shadow of the Battle The Lord Jesus waged and will wage to lead His faithful believers to salvation (at the cross) and His Millennial Kingdom (at Armageddon), when the Earth will be taken from Satan and return to Christ (just as Joshua was removing the Canaanite usurpers out of the Promised Land and returning it to God’s people).

God gave Joshua very specific instructions for how the battle was to fought. Joshua then relayed them in full detail to the nation of Israel:

And the Lord said unto Joshua, See, I have given into thine hand Jericho, and the king thereof, and the mighty men of valour. And ye shall compass the city, all ye men of war, and go round about the city once. Thus shalt thou do six days.And seven priests shall bear before the ark seven trumpets of rams’ horns: and the seventh day ye shall compass the city seven times, and the priests shall blow with the trumpets.And it shall come to pass, that when they make a long blast with the ram’s horn, and when ye hear the sound of the trumpet, all the people shall shout with a great shout; and the wall of the city shall fall down flat, and the people shall ascend up every man straight before him.And Joshua had commanded the people, saying, Ye shall not shout, nor make any noise with your voice, neither shall any word proceed out of your mouth, until the day I bid you shout; then shall ye shout. So the ark of the LORD compassed the city, going about it once: and they came into the camp, and lodged in the camp.
And Joshua rose early in the morning, and the priests took up the ark of the LORD. And seven priests bearing seven trumpets of rams’ horns before the ark of the LORD went on continually, and blew with the trumpets: and the armed men went before them; but the rereward came after the ark of the LORD, the priests going on, and blowing with the trumpets. And the second day they compassed the city once, and returned into the camp: so they did six days. And it came to pass on the seventh day, that they rose early about the dawning of the day, and compassed the city after the same manner seven times: only on that day they compassed the city seven times. – Joshua 6:2-15.

 

Notice that God instructs His people to circle the city of Jericho, without raising a weapon, for seven days. And Joshua is emphatic that the people remain silent. No one is to speak or utter a sound for the seven days. And then on the seventh day, after the city was circled seven times, the nation would shout, and the walls of Jericho crumbled to dust and the Israelites slaughtered their enemies in the city and burnt it to the ground.

 

And it came to pass at the seventh time, when the priests blew with the trumpets, Joshua said unto the people, Shout; for the Lord hath given you the city….So the people shouted when the priests blew with the trumpets: and it came to pass, when the people heard the sound of the trumpet, and the people shouted with a great shout, that the wall fell down flat, so that the people went up into the city, every man straight before him, and they took the city. And they utterly destroyed all that was in the city, both man and woman, young and old, and ox, and sheep, and ass, with the edge of the sword. – Joshua 6:16-21.

The most impenetrable city in the world was defeated by supernatural judgment of God. And this followed seven days of silence. So again, the Biblical pattern is clear: there is a period of silence before Judgement of The Lord comes.

King David’s Pleaangel-WHATSHOTN

King David seemed to have a good understanding of this concept as shown in Psalm 28:

Unto thee will I cry, O LORD my rock; be not silent to me: lest, if thou be silent to me, I become like them that go down into the pit. Hear the voice of my supplications, when I cry unto thee, when I lift up my hands toward thy holy oracle. Draw me not away with the wicked, and with the workers of iniquity, which speak peace to their neighbours, but mischief is in their hearts. Give them according to their deeds, and according to the wickedness of their endeavours: give them after the work of their hands; render to them their desert. Because they regard not the works of the LORD, nor the operation of his hands, he shall destroy them, and not build them up.– Psalm 28:1-5.

David’s plea to the Lord highlights what can lead to The Lord being silent with a person. It is those who are headed for damnation (“who go down to the pit”). The unrepentant sinners who have no fear or understanding of God. David makes his case by reminding God of his prayer and worship of The Lord. He is proclaiming his belief in God as the sovereign ruler of his life. But those who are wicked, workers of sin, deceitful (“they speak peace to their neighbors, but mischief is in their hearts”), and do not acknowledge God (“they regard not the works of the LORD, nor the operation of his hands..”), they do not receive a Word from The Lord. And their ultimate end is destruction. So again, it’s clear that the silence of God precedes devastating judgment.

Psalm 50 provides a stern warning:

But unto the wicked God saith, What hast thou to do to declare my statutes, or that thou shouldest take my covenant in thy mouth? Seeing thou hatest instruction, and casteth my words behind thee. When thou sawest a thief, then thou consentedst with him, and hast been partaker with adulterers. Thou givest thy mouth to evil, and thy tongue frameth deceit. Thou sittest and speakest against thy brother; thou slanderest thine own mother’s son. These things hast thou done, and I kept silence; thou thoughtest that I was altogether such an one as thyself: but I will reprove thee, and set them in order before thine eyes. Now consider this, ye that forget God, lest I tear you in pieces, and there be none to deliver. – Psalm 50:16-22.

 

So again we see the pattern: rebellion against God, that rebellion reaching an extreme limit, silence from God, then judgment. Here God Himself, speaking through the Psalmist warns the sinner in deep rebellion that if they continue to forget God, they will be torn in pieces with no chance of deliverance.

The Wrath of God In Revelation

With these prophetic types and precepts the understanding of the silence in heaven becomes clearer:

And when he had opened the seventh seal, there was silence in heaven about the space of half an hour. And I saw the seven angels which stood before God; and to them were given seven trumpets. – Revelation 8:1-2.

In this future event that takes place during the end times the seven trumpets given to the angels who stand before The Lord each bring forth devastating judgments to the people on Earth. The trumpets, along with the vial judgments that follow, are the true outpouring of God’s wrath. The Earth itself will be damaged and poisoned, millions upon millions suffer and perish. The trumpets will be discussed in much more detailed in later installments of this series, but the point to understand is that just as it was in the days of Noah, and as it was at the battle of Jericho, the silence of God comes before He is preparing to unleash His wrath.

Is The Silence Really For A Half Hour?

It is this author’s contention that the silence in Heaven is not actually for 30 minutes. Hence the Scripture saying “about the space of half an hour.” The Apostle John makes the point that he is not marking an exact duration of time. Could the sequence of events be the 6th Seal with its Rapture, global earthquake and stellar signs, the opening of the 7th seal and then seven days of silence before The Lord’s wrath begins with the blowing of the trumpets and their unprecedented judgments on Earth? While this author will not be dogmatic and say it’s definitely so, the consistency is there. At the flood in Genesis, the silence of God was for seven days. At Jericho, there were seven days of silence until the city was circled seven times. In Revelation, the seventh seal is open, which leads to the silence and then seven angels are given seven trumpets to unleash God’s wrath.  The types and shadows of Scripture certainly give some credence to the idea.

Pray For God To Not Be Silent

If God seems silent in your life, cry out to Him in prayer.

If God seems silent in your life, cry out to Him in prayer.

There are many mysterious verses in Scripture but the beauty of the Bible is that with God’s Holy Spirit and enough study, they can be understood. And while the Silence in Heaven is a future event, Scripture is quite clear that when we are in rebellion God can be silent with us. And that is a scary proposition. Make sure you are hearing from The Lord every day by studying His Word also find Salvation and praying consistently with repentance.

Be silent, O all flesh, before the LORD: for he is raised up out of his holy habitation.

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